More Words About Words

Others have already put together some amazing lists of words about words.  Here are three that I think are exceptional:

  1. StartWright even made up their own word for words about words: “Nymomyms”.  Here‘s their list.
  2. ScrollSeek has an extensive list also.  I found at least a few that weren’t on other lists.  Check it out.
  3. Ragan’s PR Daily has a list of only fourteen, but there’s a couple not on the other lists.  It’s a fine list, especially if you don’t have time for the more exhaustive (pun intended) ones.

And here’s a sweet sampling for my fellow logophiles:

  1. 1. Ambigram—a word that can be turned upside down and still be read as the same word. Example: MOW or NOON  (from Ragan’s “14 Words about Words”)
  2. 2. Antimetabole—a word or a phrase that is repeated in the opposite order in the next clause or phrase.  Example: “Fair is foul, and foul is fair.” (from Ragan’s 14)
  3. Antanaclasis: Repetition of a word whose meaning changes in the second instance. “Your argument is sound…all sound.” — Benjamin Franklin. (from ScrollSeek)
  4. Camouflanguage: Language that uses jargon, euphemisms, and other devices to hide the true meaning of what is being said.  (from ScrollSeek)
  5. Epizeuxis: Repetition of a word with vehemence or emphasis. “Alone, alone, all all alone. Alone on a wide wide sea.” — Samuel Taylor Coleridge. See: palilogy, ploce. (from ScrollSeek)
  6. paranym a word whose meaning is altered to conceal evasion    

    (from StartWright; too bad they don’t give an example.  I included it in my list of faves because I like the concept!)

  7. babblative given to babbling; prattling, prating, loquacious   

    (from StartWright)

  8. tmesis inserting a word in the
    middle of another;separation of the parts of a compound word by one or more intervening
    words
    nobloominway   

    (from StartWright)

  9. catachresis (n) 1: use of the wrong word for the context
    2 : use of a forced and especially paradoxical figure of speech (as blind mouths)

    (from StartWright; it’s an interesting concept!)

  10. verbivore (n) lover of words

    (from StartWright; maybe this would be better defined as a consumer of words?)

If you enjoyed these, you’re sure to find more bon-mots in the lists given above.  Enjoy!

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