Fifteen Fun & Friendly Phrases

Silly salutations:

  1. See ya later, alligator!
  2. After awhile, crocodile!
  3. What’s the dope, antelope?
  4. Hello there, honey bear!
  5. How are you, kangaroo?
  6. What’s up, buttercup?
  7. What’s the word, hummingbird?
  8. What’s the gist, physicist?
  9. Care to remark, meadow lark?
  10. Bend my ear, little dear!
  11. Word on the street, parakeet?
  12. What’s your spiel, little seal?
  13. Good bye, sweetie pie!
  14. What’s your tale, killer whale?
  15. Come again, little wren?

Can you think of (or make up) more fun phrases for greeting a gabby neighbor?  Share your ideas in the comments!

Advertisements

A Slew of Charms & Luck Galore

Cliffs of Moher

Did you know the English language has words galore of Irish origin?  (Galore being one of them; so is slew.)  Besides enriching our vocabulary, Ireland has contributed immensely to our culture in America.  Here’s a few of my favorite things from the Emerald Isle:

  1. Baileys Irish Cream
  2. Irish coffee with Baileys
  3. pubs
  4. “Oh Danny Boy”
  5. green, green landscapes, green that seems lit from within
  6. the name Hooley
  7. the word hooligan
  8. irrepressible good humor
  9. C. S. Lewis
  10. W. B. Yeats
  11. James Joyce
  12. Enya
  13. shamrocks
  14. St. Patrick
  15. Waterford crystal
  16. Donegal tweed
  17. fishermen’s sweaters
  18. wild land/seascapes and appreciation for the wild
  19. quirky proverbs
  20. and beautiful blessings

On this St. Patrick’s Day, may God bless the Irish, and

May the road rise up to meet you.

May the wind always be at your back.

May the sun shine warm upon your face,

And rains fall soft upon your fields.

And until we meet again,

May God hold you in the palm of His hand.

(An Old Irish Blessing)

Sounding Letters

Twelve Things I Liked About Spelling Tests In Grade-School

  1. I liked numbering the page lines.
  2. I liked listening for each word.
  3. I liked my confidence in spelling.
  4. I liked the A’s I achieved.
  5. I liked spelling the words: thinking through each letter.
  6. I liked sounding them out in my head.
  7. I liked the “metered” Q and A rhythm.
  8. I liked the review for self-checking at the end.
  9. I liked preparing for the tests.  Mom would quiz me at home.
  10. I liked writing the words: putting each letter onto the page.
  11. I liked writing them methodically.
  12. Mostly I liked listening and sounding in my head.  It was as though that process was rewarded with a printed word.  Seeing the word as a result of listening was magical!

This is such a simple memory, but as it is such a powerful memory of pleasurable confidence, which was atypical of me in relation to test-taking, I am grateful to remember this consistently positive experience of performance, particularly in the context of a judged test.

And what fun to remember the delight in sounding out each newly learned word in my mind’s ear, hearing and savoring each luscious letter.